Wednesday, 11 January 2017

Weaving Denise Gates, Sandra Kendall January Meeting 2017

This month our workshop was on tapestry weaving led by two of our own members. Denise has been weaving for a number of years and produces fine detailed weavings.[see examples below]




 Sandra has only just started weaving a few months ago and is favouring textural weavings with found objects. [see below]








Members were told that weaving is very ancient craft going back into the stone age and practically every culture developed some form of weaving. Looms varied according to the needs and lifestyle of that culture.
We were also reminded that we had probably done some weaving in our embroidery e.g. darning, needleweaving, backstitch wheels etc.
 Denise and Sandra demonstrated how to warp our cardboard looms under tension and then how to do plain weaving.
We then warped our looms and made a start on plain weaving remembering not to put the weft under any tension otherwise we would have a piece of weaving with a "waist!" 


 As members reached the end of their thread they were shown how to add another colour and some brightly coloured pieces began to emerge.



Member then began to experiment with different textures, horizontal and vertical stripes and blocks of colour.


 Soumak, tassells and rya were demonstrated and members were able to add any of these stitches to their weavings.

 
 It was a very busy and profitable day with members enjoying learning new skills. 
We only scratched the surface of what you can do with weaving but by the end of the day you could see that members had already started to develop their own style and will hopefully go on to do more.
Thank you to Denise and Sandra for a good day.

Sunday, 18 December 2016

Ice Walker Harrogate 2016

If you get a chance to see the Ice Walker he is definitely worth a look. Here are some of the pictures I took in Harrogate of him and the surrounding embroidered badges.
The embroidery on the costumes for the Game of Thrones is also very interesting: just type into your search engine "Game of thrones embroidery" and click on images and the costumes will appear.









Wednesday, 9 November 2016

Felt Angels Maureen Clement November Meeting 2016


 Maureen, who is one of our own members, led this month's meeting by showing us how to make angels from wet felt ready for Christmas.
She showed us a whole array of very pretty angels in different colours, embroidered in different ways and completed using a variety of techniques. See below
 



Maureen demonstrated how to make the base of the angels in two ways; by making a piece of flat felt and then cutting out a circle or using a resist to make two circles. After three layers of fibres had been laid out, soap and water were added.This was then felted by rolling etc.

Flat felt being rolled 




 
Felt being made around a resist
We then were given a demonstration of how to make a felt ball for the head hopefully without any creases!


Because all the felt needed to dry we were given instruction on how to complete the angels and we took them home to dry and complete.
Once the felt circles were dry we were to cut them in half and make each half circle into a cone for the body. We were advised to embroider while flat and then sew the cone together. The head would be attached next and features added. Hair could be made from a variety of fibres. Lastly wings were to be designed and made using any technique we wanted. 
Maureen said that pieces could be attached by needle felting and if we had an embellisher we could use that to make the body. One of our members brought her embellisher to do just that.
 Maureen told us how she likes making felt particularly pieces that have been manipulated and she showed us some beautiful pieces she had made.

 At the end of the workshop we took our wet felt home to complete our angels and bring them back to the Christmas meeting where we can enter them in the competition.
So when you look at next month's post you should see a choir of felted angels, all complete and embellished in a variety of ways!
Thank you to Maureen for leading the workshop and giving us such clear instructions.